ABRAHAM MASLOW

(Psychologist, 1 April 1908 – 8 June 1970)


Centrum voor Belevingspsychologie - Abraham Maslow

AREA FOR SPECIAL ATTENTION AND WORK
Maslow developed the humanistic psychology, also known as the Third Force Psychology or the theory of the increasing need in the sixties of the previous century. Maslow regards a person as a uniquely motivated individual with a vast range of motives. In order to be able to develop into a healthy personality, Maslow says that a number of human basic needs should be satisfied. All these fundamental needs are innate.
This means that each person goes through a certain needs construction, the so-called pyramid of Maslow or the hierarchy of needs by Maslow; first your basic needs have to be satisfied, before you can satisfy your more luxurious, less necessary needs. Only if all the deprivation needs (the first three bullets) are satisfied, can you start the process of self-actualization and are you mentally healthy.

The basic needs are:

Primary biological needs, or physical needs (food, liquids, clothing, shelter)
Social Security (need for physical safety)
Social need (belonging, companionship, love)
Acknowledgement (self-image, reputation, self-esteem, self-respect)
Self-actualisation (self-realization, doing what your calling is)
Transcendental needs.

CONTRIBUTION OF MASLOW TO THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EXPERIENCE

Maslow contributed to the knowledge concerning the value and the needs system of a person, based on his Humanistic Psychology. As Adler mentioned the ‘will to power’, Maslow mentioned, apart from his attention to the deprivation needs (Food, safety, love) also the individual human needs for development. The psychology of experience has adopted this as part of the knowledge database and contributes to the substantiation of ACT.
Self-respect, self-realization are basic elements of HBM and the underlying applications. Many of Maslow his ideas appear in the Circle of Change regarding the process of self-actualization.

BOOKS
A theory of Human Motivation
Motivation and Personality
Religions, Values and Peak-experiences
Eupsychian Movement
The Psychology of Science
Toward a Psychology of Being
The Farther Reaches of Human Nature


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